What 23andMe’s Genetic Test Won’t Tell You About Risk of Alzheimer’s Disease

In April 2017, 23andMe received approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to sell a genetic health risk test directly to consumers. The resulting DNA test report contains interesting information on “wellness” traits, such as how quickly one will metabolize caffeine, predispositions to alcohol flush reaction, sleep movement, lactose intolerance, and more. The… Read More »

Collision Conference Recap: Robotics, AI, and VR for Health Care

The Collision conference, held last week in New Orleans, is a unique mashup of technology talks that offer wide ranging views on how emerging technologies are shaking up everything from the music and auto industries to health care, clean energy, and more. The conference also offered a showcase for promising startups, with what seems like… Read More »

Sleep Apnea and Memory Loss

  Sleep is a vital biological function for humans – we spend about 30% of our lives sleeping. Good sleep is important for memory consolidation (processing newly learned information). It’s also important for clearing out metabolic debris from the brain each day — including amyloid beta protein, one of the markers of Alzheimer’s disease. Sleep… Read More »

Priming Your Brain for Behavior Change

 If you want to reach an important health goal like consistently eating healthier or dramatically reducing the risk of a heart attack, it’s the small, incremental changes over time that matter the most for success. The “all or nothing” behavior change approach usually fails: about 80% of New Year’s resolutions come undone by the middle… Read More »

Bilingual Brains Provide More Protection Against Alzheimer’s & Dementia

  If you speak two languages, you’ve given your brain a big boost against Alzheimer’s disease, according to a recent study published in the Proceedings of National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). The PNAS study recruited 85 people from Northern Italy who had all been diagnosed with early stage Alzheimer’s. Forty people in the study spoke… Read More »